Month: March 2014

The Plum Recipes That’ll Make You Fall In Love With This Stone Fruit

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It’s easy to forget about plums. They’re not the most popular of summer fruits. Plums aren’t small and cute like blueberries. They’re not as exotic as the fig. Plums are just plums. And so in the frenzy of stocking up on summer’s bounty, it’s easy to overlook this humble fruit. But that’s a big mistake

We think plums are pretty great — they’re perfectly sweet and tart, not too big and not too small. They make killer cakes, jams and tarts; as well as a great wine popsicle, too.

To make sure you don’t pass up on plums this season, we rounded up the best recipes around.

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24 Reasons To Seek Out Fresh Figs

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Dried figs are great and all, but if you’ve ever tasted a fresh fig you know that there’s no contest between the two. Sweet and honeyed, fresh figs are a rare treat meant to be savored. They were, after all, the foods of the gods.

When you see figs in the supermarket or farmer’s market grab a bunch, because they can be hard to find despite their long season, which runs late summer to fall. They might not always look perfect, and that’s okay because figs rarely do. The sign of a perfectly ripe fig is when you see a bit of bend in the stem and the feel of the skin is supple. Crackly skin is fine, just stay away from figs that are overly soft or oozy.

Figs are delicious eaten right out of hand, but using them in recipes is an even better way to enjoy the delicate and scarce late summer fruit. We found just the recipes to help you do that.

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Now You’re Cooking – Strawberry Granita

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One out of eight films created for Electrolux’ ‘Now You’re Cooking’ campaign.
Direction: Victor Köhler & Albin Holmqvist
D.O.P: Hannes Isaksson
Producer: Amanda Nordlöw
Food Stylist: Cilla Göthlinder
Typography & Art Direction: Albin Holmqvist
Agency: House of Radon
Campaignsite: Nowyourecooking.tumblr.com

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40 Truly Amazing Blueberry Recipes YUM!

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We have blueberries to thank for some of our favorite foods. What would mornings be without them? We wouldn’t have blueberry muffins — the only truly great muffins out there — pancakes would be fruitless, and pie just wouldn’t be as awesome (because yes, you can eat pie for breakfast). For such a tiny fruit, blueberries make some truly spectacular dishes.

Desserts-11

Since summer is short, and blueberry season fleeting, we recommend getting your fill of the blueberry while you can. Actually, we think you should add them to everything — and we’ve shown you how to do just that with the recipes below.

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The coffice: the future of work?

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Still toiling away in a grey office building? Boring! According to BT’s ‘soonologist’, you’ll get more done with coffee, cake and connectivity

Working in the coffice
Only connect: who needs to commute when you can be a coffice worker?
Age: As old as free Wi-Fi.
Appearance: Half coffee shop, half office. Hence the name.

Just a few words in and you’ve already lost me. It’s where all the cool kids work. Rather than commuting to a boring old office, they take their laptops to their local Starbucks or Costa, where they can …

Yap into their mobiles, hog the tables and wreck the atmosphere for anyone who just wants an espresso and a read of the papers? Well, yeah. But they can also surf the net, check their emails and access their Google Drives.

Is this another puff piece for the Guardian’s “achingly trendy” Shoreditch-based coffee shop? No. This is a piece about the changing face of work, as described by Nicola Millard. She’s a futurologist for BT.

A whatologist? She is paid to advise BT and its big customers on how working life will change over the next few years. She prefers to call herself a “soonologist”.

She’s joking, of course? One can only hope so, though one of her peers does call himself a “trend DJ”. Millard’s favourite place to work, she says, is somewhere with a bit of a life but no colleagues to distract her. “My four criteria for working,” she says, “are that I need good coffee, I need good cake, I need great connectivity – the Wi-Fi wings to fly me into the cloud – and I need company.”

That’s all very interesting … But what does it mean for the rest of us?

Precisely. Not much if you’re stacking shelves or changing old people’s incontinence pads. But if you’re a “knowledge-based” worker, Millard points out, all you need for most of the time is a phone, a computer and an internet connection. This could be in your local cafe – or it could be in your home. “There is no reason why knowledge workers shouldn’t all be working flexibly in five years’ time,” according to Millard.
How much does a futurologist earn? I too have a gift for stating the obvious. It’s not obvious to everyone. Just last year the internet giant Yahoo! banned its executives from working at home. Being “one Yahoo!”, apparently, “starts with being physically together”.

I think I’m going to be physically sick. I’ve got a better idea. Let’s go to the pubfice.

Don’t say: “I’m working late.”
Do say: “I’ll be working on latte.”

Source: The Guardian

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Breakfast Interrupted

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One of our most recent shoots, titled Breakfast Interrupted, is now live for your viewing pleasure. Shot primarily with the Phantom HD Gold at 1000fps, the piece is designed to showcase food in a beautiful and unusual way.

The idea was brought to us by our friends at marlinnetwork.com, for their annual breakfast event.
More at our blog.

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How to make sushi

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Points to remember

Rinse the sushi rice in cold water until the water runs clear, then soak roughly two parts rice to three parts cold water in a saucepan for 30 minutes.
Next, bring the rice to the boil, cover and cook for 10 minutes or until the rice has absorbed all the water and is tender. Check the packet instructions for exact timings.
Stir through the rice vinegar and sugar.
Cool the rice down as quickly as you can by spreading it onto a baking tray and covering with a slightly damp tea towel.
Place a nori sheet on top of your sushi rolling mat.
Dampen your hands to prevent sticking, then pick up a handful of rice and spread evenly on your nori sheet, leaving the top third uncovered.
Place a thin row of filling ingredients across the middle of the rice.
Hold the near edge of the mat, lift and roll away from you, encasing the filling. Ensure the ingredients stay in place and the rice sticks.
Dampen the top boarder with a little water to seal. Wrap tightly in cling film and chill until firm.
Brush your knife with rice vinegar to prevent sticking and cut the roll into neat rounds.
Serve with pickled ginger and a dollop of wasabi.

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